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Saturday 24 December 2011

I would like to wish everyone I work with and all visitors to this website the compliments of the season. Have a well-deserved break and all the best for the New Year. Click on this link to hear one of my all-time favourite Christmas songs...

Saturday 17 December 2011

There was full house for Laundry Night with author Charles Stross at the Pulp Fiction bookshop. This lively event ran very smoothly and Charlie was at the top of his game, making my job as host a pleasure. You can read Paul F. Cockburn's review of the whole show for the Scottish Review of Books here.

Monday 12 December 2011

I will be the host for Laundry Night with author Charles Stross at the Pulp Fiction bookshop in Edinburgh. As Charlie says on his blog, he'll be doing his "very first proper interview/Q&A and reading from The Apocalypse Codex" on Saturday 17 December at 3:00 p.m. "Editor, writer, and sometime co-conspirator Andrew J. Wilson has kindly agreed to give the introductory talk and interview; coffee and refreshments will be available," he adds... This is event is free, but space is limited, so you'll need to get a ticket to reserve a seat. There's a link to the Facebook event page here.

Sunday 4 December 2011

I was called off the substitutes' bench to perform at Illicit Ink's latest show, Time Will Tell. There's a splendid photo of me in full flow taken by Chris Scott here. I was delighted to appear alongside Ken MacLeod, Catriona Silvey, Marianne Paget, Jennifer Bryce, Laura Gavin, Silvia Barlaam, Mairi Campbell-Jack and Ariadne Cass-Maran. The proceedings were nimbly and wittily hosted by Tom Moore. To read the Scottish Review of Books review of the show, click here. Thanks to Barbara Melville and Matthew Nadelhaft for making this happen.

Monday 28 November 2011

I have just signed the contract for a very short story. "From Mrs Bean's Cookbook" will be published in 100 Horrors from Cruentus Libri Press early in 2012. This story was originally written for the Wigtown Book Festival "On the Edge" short story competition in 2008, and was picked as joint runner-up. "From Mrs Bean's Cookbook" is a drabble, which means that it is exactly 100 words long, just like the majority of the tales in this e-book edited by Kevin G. Bufton.

Sunday 6 November 2011

My poem "The Whites of Their Eyes" has been reprinted in Dark Metre, a monthly e-mail newsletter edited by Katy Bennett. Her Dark Metre blog can be found here. "The Whites of Their Eyes" was originally published in Vicious Verses and Reanimated Rhymes: Zany Zombie Poetry for the Undead Head (Coscom Entertainment) in 2009.

Monday 31 October 2011

The Autumn edition of the Journal of the Acupuncture Association of Chartered Physiotherapists has been published. At 148 pages, this is the largest issue yet. Among the highlights are two original literature reviews, a reprint of  an important paper on acupuncture for chronic low back pain by Dr Brian M. Berman et al. and a comprehensive report on the Association's Annual Conference. This edition also features my interview with Vivienne Fort, the new Chair of the Association, and the usual regular columns and reports.

Thursday 27 October 2011

Tonight was Better Read Than Dead, the Writers' Bloc tenth anniversary show. As a founding member of this Edinburgh-based spoken-word performance collective, I was delighted to be able to read my story "Hopeful Travellers", which was originally published in Scottish Book Collector and has become a popular tale at readings over the years. Other fine writers appearing at Better Read Than Dead included: Kirsti Wishart, Andrew C. Ferguson and Gavin Inglis, new members Helen Jackson, Stuart Wallace, Bram E. Gieben and Mark Harding, and comrade-in-exile-but-back-for-the-night Stefan Pearson.

Wednesday 5 October 2011

The new Acupuncture Association of Chartered Physiotherapists website went live today. I was asked to edited the content before it went online, and was pleased to be able to use my website-related skills to refine and polish the substantial amount of material available for both the general public and the membership.

Wednesday 21 September 2011

Tonight I chaired popular science-fiction author Charles Stross at his Sci-Fife event at Kirkcaldy Library. l introduced him with a version of the appreciation I wrote for a convention in Boston, MA, at which he was the guest of honour earlier this year. Charlie then read a section of his new novel, Rule 34. I asked him a few questions about his writing, his experiences and his up-and-coming projects, and after that, we opened the session up to the floor. This was a lively and entertaining evening for everyone in attendance.

Thursday 15 September 2011

Critical Insights: Harlan Ellison, edited by Joseph Francavilla, has been published by Salem Press. It features my essay "All Roads Lead to Hell: Harlan Ellison, Cormac McCarthy, and the Bitter End of the American Dream". This study compares and contrasts Ellison's post-apocalyptic stories "A Boy and His Dog" and "I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream" with McCarthy's The Road, and discusses the tradition of the Last Man in literature. I am pleased to report that the publisher has mentioned my chapter both on their website and on the back cover of the book.

Tuesday 23 August 2011

A revised and updated version of the Acupuncture Association of Chartered Physiotherapists patient information leaflet has been published. I was asked by the Association to work on both the text and the layout of Acupuncture in Physiotherapy, and commissioned the graphic designer who realised the final product. Thousands of these leaflets will be printed and distributed, so it was as important as ever to get every last details right.

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I performed with the other members of Writers' Bloc at the Charlotte Square Spiegeltent tonight. This show, entitled Electric Lit Orchestra, was part of the Edinburgh International Book Festival's Unbound strand. All the stories we read dealt with music in one way or another. I performed "No Exit", which was originally published in the One O'Clock Gun, accompanied by original live music from my friends Charlotte Halton on saxophone and Kenny MacKay on guitar. I was also flattered to be asked to read the closing tale, Helen Jackson's "Living Silver", which featured accompaniment by singers from two fine Edinburgh choirs! You can find the Scottish Review of Books report here.

Tuesday 16 August 2011

Tonight saw an almost full house for my PBH's Free Fringe 2011 show, Andrew J. Wilson - The Last Man in Space. To quote from the programme: "For one night only, Scottish spacemen, doo-wop devil worshippers and quite possibly the end of the world as we know it… All this and special guests too! Award-winning author and unreliable narrator Andrew J. Wilson performs his startling original stories with a powerful and inimitable voice. 'Barn-storming' (Scotland on Sunday)." Pitched as The Larry Sanders Show meets The Twilight Zone, as directed by David Lynch, my shenanigans were aided and abetted by Stuart Wallace, Tribute to Venus Carmichael (with Kelly Brooks on vocals and Andrew C. Ferguson on guitar), and Madeleine Shepherd.

Thursday 4 August 2011

The Autumn edition of the Journal of the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Women's Health was published today. This issue is over a week ahead of schedule, and features a healthy range of both clinical and more general material. The cover of JACPWH features a spectacular photograph of the Clyde Auditorium at sunset. Affectionately known as "the Armadillo", it is the venue for this year's joint ACPWH and International Continence Society annual conference.

Thursday 21 July 2011

Split Screen editor Andy Jackson has accepted another of my poems for his forthcoming anthology (see below). This time I have plugged a gap in the contents with lines about none other than Emperor Ming from the Flash Gordon series. "Merciless" will be published beside Helen Ivory's poem on the Child Catcher from Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. The initial launch event is likely to be held at the StAnza poetry festival in St Andrews, which will take place from 14 to 18 March 2012.

Thursday 7 July 2011

Steven Pirie has published another very positive review of Fables from the Fountain at The Future Fire: "Do I recommend Fables From the Fountain? Without a doubt."

Friday 1 July 2011

A Sea of Alone: Poems for Alfred Hitchcock has been published and is available from Amazon. Compiled by award-winning editor and writer Christopher Conlon, this anthology features thirty-five contributors including myself.

Sunday 26 June 2011

Fables from the Fountain has received a glowing notice at The Green Man Review. My contribution, "The Last Man in Space", is singled out as "the best story here... It also is perhaps the truest in spirit to the stories in Clarke’s collection." Fables from the Fountain is, of course, an anthology paying tribute to Sir Arthur C. Clarke's Tales from the White Hart.

Tuesday 26 April 2011

My haiku sequence "Hakai-no-Renga for Inspector Harry Callahan" has been accepted for publication in Split Screen, an original poetry anthology edited by Andy Jackson for Red Squirrel Press. The book showcases work inspired by film and television, and pits related themes against each other by featuring two contrasting poems on facing pages. My Dirty Harry poem will square up to Mike Dillon's take on blaxploitation icon John Shaft.

Friday 22 April 2011

Despite a last-minute change in its scheduled time slot, the launch of Fables from the Fountain at Illustrious, the 2011 Eastercon, was a very well-attended affair. Because of a delay to my flight, I got to the event with seconds to spare, but was delighted to meet many other contributors and sign copies of the anthology, which features my short story "The Last Man in Space" (see below). Editor Ian Whates told me at the end of the convention that half of the copies of the signed, limited edition hardback have already been sold and the paperback is doing very well too.

Thursday 14 April 2011

I had the pleasure of chairing "Fiction to the Future: The Science of Science Fiction" at Edinburgh's Pleasance Theatre this evening. Sponsored by Blackwell's, and featuring Iain M. Banks, Ken MacLeod and Charles Stross, this lively Edinburgh International Science Festival event focused on the intersection of science and stories, and how each can influence the other. Ken read from his forthcoming novel, Iain delivered what can only be described as an autobiographical comedy routine, Charlie gave us an except from one of his award-winning stories and I read a section of "The Last Man in Space". A fascinating discussion and then questions from the audience followed. Many thanks to Ann Landmann, events manager of the South Bridge Blackwell bookshop, for organising everything and looking after us all.

Saturday 9 April 2011

Lois Tilton has reviewed Ian Whates' anthology Fables from the Fountain for Locus Online. As she says, it features "a pretty high-powered lineup of authors", including Ian Watson, Neil Gaiman, Stephen Baxter and Charles Stross. My own contribution, "The Last Man in Space", gets a thumbs up and is described as, "A particularly neat skiffy tall tale." The book will be launched later this month at Illustrious, the 2011 Eastercon, which is being held in The Hilton Birmingham Metropole, NEC, Birmingham. The event scheduled for 6:00 p.m. on Friday 22 April.

Tuesday 15 March 2011

The Spring edition of the Journal of the Acupuncture Association of Chartered Physiotherapists was scheduled to be published today, but I'm pleased to say that the bulk was dispatched from the printer last Friday, four days ahead of schedule. Among the contents are a trenchant opinion piece by Jennie Longbottom, the former Chair of the Association, a comprehensive literature review of acupuncture for post-stroke rehabilitation and a fascinating insight into traditional Chinese medicine. This edition also includes a pleasing variety of case reports, Clinical Editor John Wheeler's usual wit and insight, and my own interview with AACP Ltd Chief Executive Officer Greg Byrne. At 124 pages, including a sixteen-page colour section, this represents another benchmark for this flagship publication.

Thursday 3 March 2011

Earlier this week, I made a long-overdue and very useful visit to Henry Ling Limited in Dorchester. I've worked with these printers and typesetters for many years, but this is the first time I've made the journey down to Dorset. The effort was well worth it, not least to reinforce how far printing techniques and technologies have come over the past couple of decades. I was particularly pleased to meet many colleagues face to face. These encounters are always helpful, and in this case, generated many fresh ideas that will further streamline production processes for my clients and myself.

Friday 25 February 2011

My short story "The Last Man in Space" has been accepted for publication in Fables from the Fountain. This anthology pays tribute to Sir Arthur C. Clarke's Tales from the White Hart and features many notable British writers, including Ian Watson, Neil Gaiman, Stephen Baxter and Charles Stross. It will be published in May 2011 to coincide with the Arthur C. Clarke Award. Fables from the Fountain is produced in part to raise funds for the Award, which lost its sponsor last year due to the closure of Sir Arthur’s publishing company.

My story evolved from ideas that I contributed to the Alba ad Astra project, which was a collaboration between Madeleine Shepherd and Writers' Bloc.

Wednesday 23 February 2011

The Ghost of William Shatner (see Thursday 17 February 2011 below) was a blast. The subterranean wonderland of The Caves proved to be the perfect venue. It was a pleasure to perform to a full house alongside a cardboard cut-out of Captain Kirk and 25 other performers, including Andrew C. Ferguson, Jane McKie, Nick-e Melville, Anita Govan, Mark Harding and the wonderful Peggy Hughes from the Scottish Poetry Library. I'm pleased to say that the event raised over £250 for charity.

I performed Nick Cave's "We Call Upon the Author", and you can hear my interpretation of his lyrics about two-thirds of the way down this web page (the audio contains some strong language and adult themes; you have been warned). There may also be a video in due course...

Thursday 17 February 2011

I have been invited to read at an event called The Ghost of William Shatner (an inspired title, if ever there was one) at The Caves in Edinburgh's Niddry Street South on Wednesday 23 February at 8.00 p.m. This is part of the Let's Get Lyrical campaign, Edinburgh UNESCO City of Literature and Glasgow UNESCO City of Music's month-long celebration of "the soundtrack that carries us through life, the one expression of the written word everyone loves reciting and sharing: song lyrics". The Ghost of William Shatner is a special, one-off performance staged by my friend and collaborator Gavin Inglis. It's an encore for Underword, the spoken-word show that he ran successfully throughout the 2009 Edinburgh International Festival Free Fringe. I regularly read my own work aloud, but this evening is dedicated to performing other people's words to see if the lyrics can work without the music. I've chosen a song by Nick Cave. Come along to find out why. The Ghost of William Shatner is a charity event in aid of the Nerine Shatner Friendly House, a home for women in recovery from alcohol and drug addiction. Admittance is by donation (suggested contribution, £4.00).

Tuesday 8 February 2011

This evening's Scottish launch of By Grand Central Station We Sat Down and Wept (see Monday 17 January 2011 below) packed out the bookshop of Edinburgh's Fruitmarket Gallery. This poetry anthology, devised and edited by Kevin Cadwallender, and published by Red Squirrel Press, is an impressive publication. A host of poets and readers came to the event, and many writers, including myself, read their contributions.

Monday 31 January 2011

The Spring edition of the Journal of the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Women's Health was published today. I'm pleased to say that, despite some challenges, this issue was released two weeks ahead of schedule. Much of the clinical content of the Spring edition is derived from the Association's annual conference, including the keynote Margie Polden Memorial Lecture by Liz Campbell, the director of Wellbeing of Women. I was particularly happy to be able to use my design and layout skills to deliver a polished final product.

Monday 17 January 2011

I am delighted to announce that I will be reading at the launch of By Grand Central Station We Sat Down and Wept. The event will take place in The Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh, at 7.00 p.m. on Tuesday 8 February. This anthology includes my poem "Carry a Legend Like a Banner". Like all the other contributions commissioned by editor Kevin Cadwallender, my poem was inspired by a phrase from By Grand Central Station I Sat Down and Wept, Elizabeth Smart's classic novel of prose poetry. This anthology features 57 writers from throughout the UK, including Sebastian Barker, Elizabeth Smart's son, who has given this book his blessing.

Monday 13 December 2010

My essay "All Roads Lead to Hell: Harlan Ellison, Cormac McCarthy, and the Bitter End of the American Dream" has been accepted for publication in Critical
Insights: Harlan Ellison
, edited by Joseph Francavilla.
This study compares and contrasts Ellison's post-apocalyptic stories "A Boy and His Dog" and "I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream" with McCarthy's The Road, and discusses the tradition of the Last Man in literature. Critical Insights: Harlan Ellison will be released by Salem Press/EBSCO Publishing in September 2011.

Friday 12 November 2010

The cover of A Sea of Alone: Poems for Alfred Hitchcock is now complete. I have a poem in this anthology, which has been compiled by award-winning editor and writer Christopher Conlon. Among the thirty-four other contributors is my father, who actually corresponded with the Master of Suspense and saw him at work on the set of his last film. A Sea of Alone is scheduled for publication in the first quarter 2011. The editor tells me that the publisher believes that this book could be a major commercial and critical hit by poetry standards. The marketing plan for A Sea of Alone will include a book trailer to maximize its impact at the time of release. You can see the cover here.

Friday 8 November 2010

Well, this is a turn-up for the books: a news item about a news item! My Finnish friend and collaborator Hannu Rajaniemi is interviewed by Richard Lea in the The Guardian. Hannu discusses his recently released first novel, The Quantum Thief, which seems set to take the world by storm. A few paragraphs in, I get a name-check when he discusses people who had an influence on his evolution as a writer. It's a very generous thing to do, so I only hope I get a chance to return the favour: this is a two-way street, of course.

Friday 1 October 2010

I was delighted to be able to attend the convivial launch party for the One O'Clock Gun Anthology at the Speakeasy in Edinburgh. Hosted by editor Craig Gibson and publisher Peter Burnett, the event was packed with writers, musicians and artists, but it was also pleasingly down to earth. Gavin Inglis and I represented the spoken-word element. Gav performed his contribution to the book, the sibilant tour de force of alliteration, "The Slaughterer of St Stephen Street", while I read my memorial to Gun contributor and mentor Angus Calder, "Orpheus in the Old Town". Pax Edina!

Thursday 23 September 2010

The Autumn edition of the Journal of the Acupuncture Association of Chartered Physiotherapists has been published. At 144 pages, this is the largest issue yet. Among the highlights are two original literature reviews, a reprint of Dr Richard C. Niemtzow's fascinating paper on battlefield acupuncture and a comprehensive report on the Association's Annual Conference. This edition also features the usual regular columns and reports, and typically witty contributions from Clinical Editor John Wheeler.

Tuesday 24 August 2010

I appeared with spoken-word performance group Writers' Bloc as part of the Edinburgh International Book Festival's Unbound programme. Held in the splendid Spiegeltent in Charlotte Square Gardens, the show attracted a full house and received an enthusiastic response from the audience, including Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy. I read a new story called "The End of the Line". This was written especially for the event, and it features "lethal punctuation and grammar so bad it'll kill you".
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